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Photo Follow-Up

IMG_8665

Photo 8665 by Nate Peirson, Night Sky in Idaho, July 2017

Myriads of Images and Memories

Hello family! I’ve received a couple of requests for how to view photos taken by Nate at the Hooley Family Reunion in Idaho 2017 & posted by Nate on this blog in an earlier post. He listed three links for viewing his photos.  Pick one, click on it, and view them on your device.  Because I’m working on a tablet without tons of storage space, and because I thought it would be faster, I’ve utilized only the first link which downloads a “zip” file (with “compressed”? data?) and allows the viewer to see a “reduced” image. I confess I don’t know what any of that means!  I’m just trusting Nate that this is the best option for the novice of such things.

After downloading the zip file (which took around three hours — again, I don’t know if that’s normal or just my situation — others might report how long it takes on your system), … after downloading the zip file, I found I couldn’t share the images on the blog as I hoped.  That is until I “extracted” them.  Again, I don’t understand any of these processes or why one thing doesn’t work but another does.  I’m just experimenting.

Even after “extracting” the photos, I found that uploading even just one to this blog’s media file took longer than I’ve experienced with other photo uploads.  Again, I don’t know if I’m just experiencing a slow system/network today, or if it’s the nature of the photo-file, or what.  I APOLOGIZE for my lack of expertise in these matters!  If others know how to do this better or faster, PLEASE instruct me!  Or actually, anyone who has accessed Nate’s files and has signed up to be an “author” for this blog can share particular photos via a post with one or more photos included.  Reminder: any Hooley family member may be an “author.”  If you want to be an “author” for this blog (which means you can publish and edit your own posts) just let me know and I will send you an invitation.  If you already received an invitation to be an author but it expired, let me know and I will send you another one.

I’ve decided I’m going to attempt to post (one at a time?) nearly/all(?) of Nate’s photos with his file numbers.  This is going to take a while.  I’m hoping others will view them and add comments with information regarding who/what is in each photo and any personal memories they care to share.  I changed the settings for this blog such that people can comment on any post at any time.

Again, this process of uploading photos is going to take a while.  So, even though downloading the whole zip file might take you three hours as it did me, that would be the quickest way for you to view all the pictures at your leisure.  The only advantage of viewing them here is that people can read each others’ comments.  For me, reading what others’ comment will make posting them here worth the time it takes.  I just hope many family members will view and comment!

THANK YOU, NATE, for taking the photos and making them available to all of us.

THANK YOU, everyone, for your patience with me as I attempt to make them available for comment-sharing.

2017 Reunion Photos

Hello!

I have converted photographs taken during the 2017 reunion and compressed them into the following zip files:

I invite you to download them as you please. Be aware, however, that these are unedited and unrefined.

Good day,

Hooley Emblem Updated!

IMG_20180203_160631  The Hooley family circle has an interwoven, multifaceted heritage that was shared at the 2017 J. Paul Hooley reunion in Idaho. The family name ‘Hooley’ was originally Holly prior to immigrating to America. Caring for the earth while providing for family has been cultivated throughout the family history. J. Paul had the desire to own his own farm to raise his and Alta’s family and to put down roots. His death soon after acquiring land placed Alta in position to birth his vision with her pioneering determination. She and her son’s dug the West End canal that gave green life to the sandy desert with it’s rimmed rock hills and sagebrush. The yellow roses symbolize the peace testimony which has been passed down through the Mennonite beliefs. The corn, wheat, peppermint, and roses depict both genders’ love and connection to the earth. Along with the vision and determination, the virtues of creativity, spirituality, and caring for the wider communities have been a continuous thread in the Hooley quilted mosaic. The Hooley emblem is a small attempt to depict the great gifts which have been passed down through the generations and began by being rooted in the Indian Cove Hooley farm.”

~ Donna Hooley (daughter of Wes and Doris)

Hooley Emblem

IMG_20180121_203020   The Hooley family circle has an interwoven, multifaceted heritage that was shared at the 2017 J. Paul Hooley reunion in Idaho. The family name ‘Hooley’ was originally Holly prior to immigrating to America. Caring for the earth while providing for family has been cultivated throughout the family history. J. Paul had the desire to own his own farm to raise his and Alta’s family and to put down roots. His death soon after acquiring land placed Alta in position to birth his vision with her pioneering determination. She and her son’s dug the West End canal that gave green life to the sandy desert with it’s rimmed rock hills and sagebrush. The yellow roses symbolize the peace testimony which has been passed down through the Mennonite beliefs. The corn, wheat, peppermint, and roses depict both genders’ love and connection to the earth. Along with the vision and determination, the virtues of creativity, spirituality, and caring for the wider communities have been a continuous thread in the Hooley quilted mosaic. The Hooley emblem is a small attempt to depict the great gifts which have been passed down through the generations and began by being rooted in the Indian Cove Hooley farm.”

~ Donna Hooley (daughter of Wes and Doris)

 

The Thanksgiving I will never forget

The Thanksgiving I Will Not Forget

Thanksgiving that year came early, it might have even been the last week of October. I flew in from Washington to to join Dad and Mom in Indian Cove, at that long family table made by pushing three tables together and merging them with table-cloths. We loaded it with all the traditional foods of Thanksgiving, just as our honored guest had requested, and gathered around it to pray a prayer of thanksgiving, to enjoy this traditional meal together, and to become acquainted with our honored guest, Juana.

Joel had met his birth mom Juana in Guatemala the summer before, and now he and his family had flown her up to meet us all when she had the occasion to come up to her friend’s in Texas. We had heard the incredible story of how God led Aunt Mary Esther to her remote Mayan village and her very door two years before this, and how Juana had burst into tears knowing this American woman’s visit was the answer to the prayer she had breathed for so many years. We marveled at how Juana’s friendship with a Texan woman had already put an interpreter ‘in place’ for Joel, and now here she was, bridging the language gap for us! We had also heard about Juana’s family gathering in her home in Guatemala to introduce Joel to all the members of his Mayan family.

Here I was seated across from Juana at our Thanksgiving table in Idaho. She sat with her red-haired friend Kristen on her left, and on her right Joel’s interpreter friend and coworker, Sheila, with the laughing dark eyes. Joel sat across from Juana with his second firefighter friend, Victor, who could also translate for him. I watched and listened while I ate. Juana savored each Thanksgiving dish passed around, as she visited comfortably with us. We savored her Guatemala tamales wrapped in banana leaves and heaped high on a platter, which had been an all-day process the day before with carefully shopped-for items. It felt as if we were all perched around there on a family tree that had just surprised us with a new beautiful blossom.

Yes, our family tree is a flowering tree! And it would bloom yet again one summer on the day of Joel’s wedding, when we would sit awed and overcome watching him handsomely escort the two women, his Mothers, dressed alike in elegant, stunning, red Mayan roses and plaids, down the grassy aisle to stand and wait for the girl with the laughing dark eyes to join him.

Each Thanksgiving dinner that I am blessed to sit down at the table with my Hooley family, or that I catch a snapshot sight of the family together without me (which is often the case), I remember our most unusual October Thanksgiving. I am brimmed full of thankfulness to God for Joel’s families, and for our beautiful, many-branched, blooming family tree!

 

Thanksgiving

Image result for wicker cornucopia filled with fruit

Call for Contributions re “Thanksgiving.”  Please share a post regarding the holiday or gratitude — generally or about something specific.  Please post your contribution in early November, 2017.

Media: Posts can take the form of Story, Poetry, Music, Photos, Research, Jokes, Recipes, How-To-Do’s, Travel Journals, Prayers, even advertisements for things you make in relation to the theme; any way that suits you is welcomed.

Tone: Contributions can be serious, humorous, scholarly, off-the-cuff.  They can be sad, happy, challenging, encouraging.  They can be original material from yourself, or transcriptions/ uploads of others’ work — but please get permission and give credit to  others’ and their sources when you use them.  If you don’t know original sources, footnote where/how you received the material.

Length: No limits.  Just keep in mind that generally people will read fewer words via an online post than they would tend to do via printed material.  If you have something very long to share, you can make it a PDF that those who choose could download.  Your post would give a brief description of what’s in the PDF and the link to the PDF.  For example, this post will be a little over 700 words.  I’ve read that most people prefer 300-1000 words for an online post.

For more information re “Calls for Contributions” see https://hooleynews.wordpress.com/2017/09/17/calls-for-contributions/